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2016 NA Program - Monday
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Monday, September 26

**Check back often for any updates**

Last updated on 09-19-16


Back to Program Overview


Monday, September 26

6:30am

HOTEL LOBBY

Sunrise Denver Walk/Run

7:00am-5:00pm

COLORADO & DENVER PREFUNCTION

Registration

7:15am – 8:15am

EXPO HALL

DENVER BALLROOM

Breakfast in Expo Hall

7:15am – 8:15am

COLORADO BALLROOM A-D

SFPE 101 - Leading the Way, SFPE Staff

 

Looking to see what you can get out of SFPE or looking to refresh? Come join the SFPE Staff for breakfast for topics covering; community highlights, IACET accreditation, database, technical highlights and much more.

General Session

8:30am – 8:50am

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Opening & Welcome Remarks, Milosh Puchovsky, P.E., FSFPE, 2016 SFPE President

8:50am – 9:00am

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

 
Chapter Welcome, Sean Donohue, P.E., Immediate Past President, SFPE Rocky Mountain Chapter

9:00am – 9:45am

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Inspiring Future Innovators, Laurie Leshin, Ph.D., President, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

 

Effective leaders and innovators aren’t always born that way. Success is a product of other people being willing to see potential and take the time to “kick down a door”. Mentor opportunities can sometimes present themselves through pure luck. How do you recognize an opportunity to be mentored and to then serve as a mentor to a future leader?

This talk details Leshin’s own journey, and her reflections on the differences that those opportunities have made in her life. She explores the responsibility that leaders and innovators have to ensure the success of the next generation.

9:45am – 10:15am

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Engineering in Developing Communities, Cathy Leslie, P.E., Executive Director, Engineers Without Borders

 

Engineers Without Borders USA (EWB-USA) is a dynamic non-profit organization based in Denver, Colorado. EWB-USA supports community-driven development programs worldwide through partnerships that design and implement sustainable engineering projects. Through these partnerships and its skilled volunteers, EWB-USA helps communities meet their basic needs such as clean water, schools, medical clinics, sanitation and renewable energy. Find out how to be a part of EWB-USA and contribute your expertise, your passion, and your global citizenship.

10:15am – 11:15am

EXPO HALL

DENVER BALLROOM

Break in Expo Hall

10:15am-11:15am

COLORADO BALLROOM A-D

Perspectives Session

Breakout Session

11:15am – 11:40am

Track A

Regulatory Policy/Codes & Standards

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D

  
Reorganization of NFPA 13-2019 Edition, Raymond A. Grill, P.E., FSFPE, LEED AP, Principal, Arup

NFPA 13 is going through a major reorganization for the 2019 Edition. A task group to the correlating committee has established a new format intended to make the document more user friendly and to provide a more logical order for application. Technical committee have been implementing the changes and reviewing public input for the 2019 Edition. This presentation will review the new organization and discuss upcoming changes and the rationale for changes.

 11:15am – 11:40am

Track B

Research

COLORADO BALLROOM 
G-J

A Comprehensive Approach for the Fire Safety Design of Tall Automated Warehouses, Paul Lhotsky, Ph.D., P.E., Eng., P.Eng. MSFPE, President, Civelec Consultants

The presentation provides information as to design challenges and design approach for tall automated warehouses. Results of fire modeling will demonstrate that using present codes for design may not be adequate to control fire. The effects of air movements on fire suppression systems as well as life safety and exiting issues will be discussed.

 11:15am – 11:40am

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM 
1&2

 
SFPE Performance-Based Design: Underground Car Park, Kristin Steranka, Fire Protection Engineer, Koffel Associates; Lauren Schrumpf, EIT, Fire Protection Engineer, Koffel Associates

The Society of Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE) provided three case study specifications from which teams around the world could choose to prepare a performance-based fire safety strategy. Each case study specified performance objectives, a basic building description, floor plans, and minimum project requirements. Koffel Associates, Inc. chose to prepare Case Study 1-Underground Car Park and made additional assumptions to complete the performance-based design analysis.

The study was completed in accordance with the International Code Council Performance Code for Buildings and Facilities, 2015 Edition. The Society of Fire Protection Engineers: Engineering Guide to Performance-Based Fire Protection, 2007 Edition served as a template for the design and reporting of the project. Two design fires were developed and analyzed using Fire Dynamic Simulator and egress calculations to determine if life safety was preserved. For each design fire, two trial fire safety designs were evaluated: with automatic sprinkler protection and without automatic sprinkler protection. A prescriptive code deficiency required the use of this analysis to ensure that adequate egress time was provided to occupants within the garage. The performance-based design developed an adequate level of life safety deemed acceptable by the stakeholders without imposing unnecessary constrains on other aspects of the building design.

11:40am – 12:05pm

Track A

Regulatory Policy/Codes & Standards

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D

 

Fire Door Inspections & Field Labeling, Justin Biller, P.E., MCP, CFPS, CLSS-HCFM, Co-Founder, Technical Director, AEGIS

 

Like other fire resistance rated construction materials under the purview of the U.S. system of codes and standards, fire doors have more than a century’s worth of testing experience published in the various listing directories made available for reference in project specifications. This testing and listing experience provides a level of confidence for door manufacturers, insurance underwriters, design professionals and approving governmental authorities that a particular door assembly has undergone stringent testing protocol, and that it can be expected to curtail losses associated with a given building fire event. By looking at the historic development of building codes and test standards related to this specific component, it is helpful to determine what has shaped the current fire door industry and better evaluate future trends in listing and labeling provisions including the increasing use of field-labeling for existing applications.

 11:40am – 12:05pm

Track B

Research

COLORADO BALLROOM 
G-J

Sprinkler Systems of the Future: The Benefit of Electronic Sprinklers, Zachary Magnone, P.E., Director – Innovation & New Ventures, Tyco Fire Protection Products; Jeremiah Crocker, Manager – New Ventures, Tyco Fire Protection Products

The hazard level of buildings is constantly increasing due to logistical/operational demands, aesthetic desires and structural innovation. However, innovation with fire sprinkler systems has been incremental and is resulting in fire sprinklers being the limiting factor for building design and operations. Tyco Fire Protection Products embarked in a research project to determine the benefits provided by include electronics as part of the fire sprinkler system. The technology has proved to provide benefits in reducing required total water supplies as compared with current technology, increased speed in sprinkler activation and reduction sprinkler activation area. The research focused on medium and full scale fire testing of cartoned unexpanded plastic and exposed expanded plastic.

 11:40am – 12:05pm

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM 
1&2

Analysis of Wind in an FDS Simulation, David Stacy, Associate, Jensen Hughes; Stephen M. Hill, P.E., Senior Fire Protection Engineer, Jensen Hughes

This presentation will examine the importance of appropriately characterizing and modeling the application of wind in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, specifically through the use of a FDS model utilized in the design of a smoke control system. Section 909.4 of the IBC requires the design team to account for the effects of wind as part of the rational analysis. Currently, there is no set standard or “best practice” of how to appropriately model wind in a FDS simulation, or which modeling approach provides the most representative results for the purpose of a smoke control analysis. Participants in this presentation will obtain knowledge on several methods of how to determine, characterize, and appropriately model wind as part of a fire modeling analysis. Key components which will be analyzed include domain range, mesh size, and several methods of characterizing the wind in an input file.

 12:05pm – 12:30pm

Track A

Regulatory Policy/Codes & Standards

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D


How FPEs Can Shape Regulatory Policy, John Barrot, P.E., Fire Engineer, New York Office Leader, Arup

 

You can make a positive difference in world by shaping regulatory policy. This session will explain why it is critically important that Fire Protection Engineers be engaged with regulators and active in policy development. Attendees will learn how they can shape policy by understanding various ways to participate in policy development at all levels of their careers from students to SFPE Fellows.

This presentation will provide real-world examples where FPEs at all levels have influenced policy and made a positive difference in the world. How is sustainable mass timber in tall buildings getting approved? How is the use of flame retardants in household products changing? How is the fire safety of garment workers in Bangladesh being improved? How can university research affect policy change? How have code changes saved lives? John hopes to inspire attendees to take a more active role in shaping policy to make a difference.

12:05pm – 12:30pm

Track B

Research

COLORADO BALLROOM
G-J

Earthquake Protection: In the Lab and Around the World, Victoria B. Valentine, P.E., Director of Engineering, National Fire Sprinkler Association; Russell P. Fleming, P.E., Senior Advisor to the President, National Fire Sprinkler Association

 

The awareness of seismic protection for fire protection systems has increased since 2000. Many research projects for earthquake reactions have included fire protection components along with other nonstructural systems. The Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) has promoted increased learning about the impact of earthquakes on the built society. Along with research data, real world experience is key to maintaining and improving the protection methods used for fire protection systems and equipment. This review will include information and outcomes from Christchurch, New Zealand; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Valparaiso, Chile; and Napa, California, USA.

12:05pm – 12:30pm

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM
1&2

Using FDS to Predict Smoke Control System Performance in a Nonstandard Atrium, Daniel Lampke, P.E., Senior Fire Protection Engineer, Heapy Engineering

Prescriptive smoke control provides basic guidelines on how to implement a smoke control system for a large atrium space. However, what happens when various architectural elements and building restrictions prevent the space from meeting the basic guidelines required for the surrounding envelope? The atrium at focus in this presentation started as a simple rectangle, but the smoke control system had to evolve as additional architectural requirements developed. From decorative drop ceilings with slot lights and openings, to pedestrian egress pathways, to an on-roof play area forcing fan relocation, this presentation will detail how the design of a once-simple smoke control system can rapidly evolve past a prescriptive basis, and how CFD can be used to evaluate the changes and provide confidence in a functional, effective system design. The presentation will include design fire development, prescriptive exhaust calculations, and how a smoke control design can evolve as architectural elements are modified.

12:30pm – 1:30pm

EXPO HALL

DENVER BALLROOM

Lunch in Expo Hall

Breakout Session

1:30pm – 1:55pm

Track A

Structural Fire Protection

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D

Fire Performance of Exposed Timber in Tall Buildings, David Barber, Principal, Arup

 

As more mass timber buildings are planned and constructed in the US, the existing code requirements for medium rise “heavy timber” buildings are being questioned. The desire by architects and owners to express the timber structure becomes a fire safety challenge where the mass timber buildings are planned as a high-rise, beyond the current code height limits. This paper discusses the limitations within the current code requirements, the impact on the compartment fire dynamics where the timber is exposed and explores the process for developing practical engineering solutions. 

 1:30pm – 1:55pm

Track B

Fire Protection Systems (New Applications, Recent Research and Testing)

COLORADO BALLROOM 
G-J

Understanding Commissioning and System Acceptance Testing, Jack Poole, P.E., FSFPE, Principal, Poole Fire Protection

This presentation will explain the differences between Acceptance Testing, System Commissioning and Integrated System Testing as it relates to fire protection and life safety systems. The presentation will explain how Commissioning is accomplished, the process for which it shall be performed and the documentation and training that should be provided as part of the overall process. The presentation with emphasize that Commissioning is a systematic process, which starts at the design phase of a project and continues through the construction and testing phases of the project to ensure that all fire protection and life safety systems and components function as required per the design criteria. The presentation will define the Commissioning Team and the importance of the Fire Commissioning Agent and discuss the documentation that should be provided as part of the overall process for Commissioning, Acceptance Testing and Integrated System Testing.

 1:30pm – 1:55pm

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM 
1&2

Fire Modeling – The Impact of Code Deviations and Various Building Features on Sprinkler Activation Time, Peter Willse, P.E., FSFPE, Vice President – Director of Research, XL Catlin Property Risk Engineering / GAPS

We will present our results from a series of fire modelling exercises. These provide valuable data that help better understand the effects of certain deviations and building features. The models use the software “Fire Dynamics Simulator” (FDS), a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of fire driven flow. Output data includes sprinkler head activation times as well as temperature profiles, velocity, smoke density etc.

 1:55pm – 2:20pm

Track A

Structural Fire Protection

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D

New Developments in Fire Resistive Test Methods and Products, Luke C. Woods, Principal Engineer – Fire Resistance and Containment, UL

This presentation will inform and update the audience on pending changes to the testing methods used for evaluating steel protection materials and new concepts in fire-resistive assemblies concerning restrained and unrestrained assemblies and load-bearing assemblies. The discussion will focus on developments in testing of fire-resistive construction test standards, the differences in the use of UL 1709 versus UL 263 for structural steel protection, the impact of new environmental testing criteria on steel protection materials, and an introduction to new technologies or ideas which are changing the traditional ideas of fire-resistive construction globally.

  1:55pm – 2:20pm

Track B

Fire Protection Systems (New Applications, Recent Research and Testing)

COLORADO BALLROOM 
G-J

Pool Fire Radiation and Spray System Design Effectiveness for LPG Storage Facilities, Noah L. Ryder, P.E., MBA, Managing Partner, Fire & Risk Alliance; Stephan J. Jordan, Principal, Custom Spray Solutions

The combination of hazardous material properties and a spherical storage arrangement for LPG provides a unique fire protection challenge. The analysis and recommendations presented were utilized to evaluate the discharge requirements for several protection system design alternatives following a fire hazards assessment of a LPGsphere farm based on best practices in the oil and gas industry. In the applied approach, thermal radiation resulting from a pool fire in the 50% containment bund around the storage spheres was calculated using CFD simulations with varying wind conditions. Detailed distributions of the spray characteristics collected using the 4S measurement device were implemented into the models to simulate the cooling effectiveness of five different candidate designs. Comparisons between the standard deflector based design and designs featuring a rotor based nozzle are drawn based on the cooling effectiveness of the system.

 1:55pm – 2:20pm

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM 
1&2

 
A Methodology for Predicting and Comparing the Fire Performance of Similar Materials, Chad Lannon, FE, Fire Engineer, Holmes Fire LP; Stanislav Stoliarov, Ph.D., Associate Professor, The Department of Fire Protection Engineering at the University of Maryland College Park; James Lord, Senior Fire Research Engineer, The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Fire Research Laboratory; Isaac Leventon, Ph.D., NRC Postdoctoral Research Associate, NIST - Fire Research Division

Fire investigators will often perform reconstructive fire testing because it is effective in identifying the cause, origin and progression of a particular fire scenario. When building these structures, materials must be purchased at building supply stores as substitutes for the original materials found during the fire investigation. Accurate reconstructive fire testing requires the laboratory structure to be outfitted with building materials that perform similar to the original materials found in the field. Therefore, a procedure was created to assist fire investigators with selecting materials for reconstructive fire testing based on the modeled full-scale fire performance of a candidate material compared to the original exemplar material. This procedure defines a systematic methodology to determine properties characterizing heat transfer and chemical decomposition of a combustible solid through milligram and or bench-scale tests. A gas-phase flame heat feedback model was developed for corner-wall flame spread and coupled with a two-dimensional pyrolysis model, ThermaKin2D. ThermaKin2D was utilized to simulate upward flame spread during the room corner test. A criterion was created that compares the fire performance of each material during this full-scale fire scenario. Overall, this procedure is expected to improve a fire investigator’s ability to perform accurate reconstructive fire tests.

 2:20pm – 2:45pm

Track A

Structural Fire Protection

COLORADO BALLROOM

A-D

A Decision Analysis Technique for Stakeholder Decision-making in Fire Design of Steel Structures, Obinna Ukeni Akaa, Ph.D., Candidate, Doctoral/Post-Graduate Student, University of Canterbury

To achieve suitable design decisions, structural fire protection of buildings needs discussions and consensus among fire design stakeholders such as fire protection engineers, architects, structural engineers etc. Many fire protection options exist toward meeting steel structural fire performance objectives; one approach is to apply passive fire protection using board systems and sprays. However, stakeholders often have divergent opinions within costs-benefits considerations on which approach is most suitable for fully developed fires.

A decision management framework implementation to support structural fire protection decision-making process is proposed. The framework entails extraction and evaluation of stakeholder views and ranking of competing fire protection options. Towards that, the steel structural fire protection views of 50 fire design stakeholders from different countries have been collected. A hybrid multi-criteria evaluation method which integrates Geometric mean method–Analytic hierarchy process–Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (GAT) is proposed and applied in the stakeholder decision analysis.

The results show the design decision priorities from aggregated stakeholder views per country and systematic ranking of the protection options. The results also show that intumescent coatings and unprotected steel are the best options in different stakeholder influence scenarios, given a general selection of steel structural fire protection options.

  2:20pm – 2:45pm

Track B

Fire Protection Systems (New Applications, Recent Research and Testing)

COLORADO BALLROOM 
G-J

BIM in Fire Protection – A Discussion for Its Evolution and Impact, Joshua Greene, P.E., Vice President, Jensen Hughes

Over the last 15 years, Building Information Modeling (BIM) has entered the collective design and construction industry consciousness and gained a foothold as the next step in the evolution of project development. From its early days part as primarily a 3D project rendering and marketing tool to its current state as an advanced design integration and construction coordination and efficiency tool, BIM has advanced rapidly. With rapid changes, design and construction professionals, as well as regulatory officials, have been forced to adapt to this new form of project development while also providing the same or a higher level of service to their clients/jurisdiction. Fire protection engineers were not immune to this advancement and industry transformation, though many struggled to recognize the new direction and adapt accordingly. This presentation will discuss the BIM evolution process within the context of its recognition and integration into the fire protection engineering discipline.

  2:20pm – 2:45pm

Track C

Fire Models

PENROSE BALLROOM 
1&2

Up and Over! The Fire Engineering Challenges of Pulling Buildable Lots Out of Thin Air, Donald Havener, P.E., Fire Protection Engineer, Cosentini Associates, a Tetra Tech Company; Maxwell French, P.E., Fire Protection Engineer, Cosentini Associates, a Tetra Tech Company

 

How can developers maximize the potential of an urban site when existing buildings can’t be demolished and abutting lots are fully built? Like any other obstacle in life’s path, they go up and over. In this presentation we will walk through efforts to assess the fire performance of a massive and fully independent structural system that will suspend a new building over the roof of an existing 7-story building. We will explore the use of the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) to determine the structural fire-proofing requirements for “build-over” and “cantilever” designs. The new building, with its first floor located approximately eight (8) stories above grade, will provide over 200,000 square feet of prime residences and amenities. This unique and aggressive approach, however, presents equally unique design challenges spanning from fire resistance to egress.

2:45pm – 3:30pm

EXPO HALL

DENVER BALLROOM

Break in Expo Hall

General Session

3:30pm – 4:10pm

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Tall Timber Buildings: A Systems Concept Analysis, Carl F. Baldassarra, P.E., FSFPE, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates

 

This presentation briefly review the status of the tall timber research underway in the U.S. as well as a number of proposed projects. The presentation will then review the “systems concept” analytic method and some of its basic principles for application to a hypothetical tall timber building design.

Performance goals for the tall timber building will be presented and a “consensus” will be reached with the audience.

The application of the systems concept will applied to the hypothetical building, identifying strengths as well as weaknesses which need to be addressed by one or more fire protection features to provide adequate and reliable protection in order to achieve the performance objectives. Where possible, a quantitative measure will be applied to the individual fire safety elements to develop a composite “score” for the building, and compare it with the required values in the GSA Appendix D, the first analytical system for modern fire safety performance analysis and design.

The question: Will the tall timber building favorably compare with today’s performance expectations?

4:10pm – 4:50pm

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Fires in the Middle East: Challenges and Opportunities, John Woycheese, P.E., Ph.D., Fire Protection Engineer, Saudi Aramco

 

The Middle East has experienced several significant fires in the past two years that have demonstrated a need for improved interactions between engineers, building owners and developers, and AHJs. A brief review of full-façade fires will lead into a discussion of the implications of various challenges, from questions of how to provide sufficient water to assessing equivalency of locally available products to determining methods to address concerns about existing code-deficient installations. Although some issues are specific to construction in the Middle East -- and indicate a need for more fire protection engineers in the region -- the broad implications apply to many developing areas.

4:50pm – 5:30pm

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

Wildland Urban Interface Fires – Emerging Challenges for FPEs, Nelson Bryner, Leader – Wildland Urban Interface Fire Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

 

Over 46 million homes in 70,000 communities are at risk of wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires, which has destroyed an average of 3000 structures annually over the last decade and is rapidly growing. Within the last 100 years in the U.S., six of the top 10 most damaging single fire events involving structures were WUI fires. In 2003, southern California fires destroyed over 3600 homes in 2003, and in 2007 southern California fires destroyed an additional 2200 homes, displaced residents of over 300,000 homes, and resulted in over $1.8 B in insured losses. In 2012-2013 over 1000 homes were destroyed from three fires in Colorado. Annual costs for WUI fires are estimated at over $14B (2009). Emerging challenges for engineers include 1) lack of fire loss data specific to WUI, 2) a limited ability to identify the vulnerabilities of structures and communities to WUI fire, 3) uncharacterized exposure to firebrands, 4) limited science to understand interaction of fire, weather, and terrain, and 5) fire codes that do not adequately address firebrand ignition. FPEs will need to address each of these challenges in order to improve the fire resilience of communities exposed to WUI wildland fires.

5:30pm – 6:30pm

COLORADO BALLROOM E&F

SFPE Fellow’s Recognition Ceremony

6:30pm – 8:00pm

OUTDOOR PLAZA

Fellow’s Reception


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